Standard 2: Resources

Community resources are identified, mobilized, and used to implement age-appropriate learning opportunities.

Acciones clave

1. Community resources: Identify, analyze, and mobilize local resources to support EiE activities.

Vea las notas de orientación:

2. Safety, access, and quality: Work with communities, education authorities, and humanitarian actors to strengthen the safety of, access to, and quality of education.

Vea las notas de orientación:

3. Community contributions: Recognize existing skills and knowledge within the community and design EiE programs that build on them.

Vea las notas de orientación:

4. Disaster risk reduction and conflict mitigation: Use community resources to develop, adapt, and deliver education that includes DRR and conflict mitigation.

Vea las notas de orientación:

Notas de orientación
1
Community resources

Community resources include the cultural, intellectual, linguistic, monetary, and material resources in a community. Examples of this are technological infrastructure related to distance education, such as radio or mobile phone coverage, and internet access and connectivity. When designing and planning an education response, education authorities and humanitarian actors should identify and analyze the locally available resources to work out how they can contribute to the response. It is important to recognize a community’s local and indigenous knowledge systems. A social audit or capacity assessment can help identify what local resources are available. It is important not to overwhelm communities, and to provide support as requested to manage incoming financial and material resources so they can provide the maximum benefit to the community. However, community resources are not a replacement for the national authorities’ legal responsibility to protect and fulfill the right to education.

Community resources can contribute to education in several ways, such as providing physical spaces for ECD centers, schools, and other learning environments, and the material and labor needed to build, maintain, and repair them. Communities also play an important role in promoting protection and supporting the emotional, physical, social, and cognitive wellbeing of learners, teachers and other education personnel, and parents and caregivers. This includes providing sufficient compensation to help teachers maintain their practice, motivation, and wellbeing. Although the national authorities have the ultimate responsibility for managing appropriate teacher compensation, in some cases communities can mobilize what resources are available to support teachers, such as in-kind or cash compensation gathered by the community education committee (for more guidance, see INEE Guidance Note on Psychosocial Support; INEE Guidance Note on Teacher Wellbeing in Emergency Settings).

To provide and monitor transparency and accountability, it is essential to keep records of the resources communities mobilize. Monitoring must include mechanisms that safeguard children, such as those that identify and track practices that may harm or exploit children, such as child labor. Other important indicators are those that identify and track instances where women or socially or economically marginalized groups are unfairly relied on to perform tasks or provide resources (for more guidance, see Minimum Standards for Child Protection).

Regresar al inicio
2
Strengthening safety, access, and quality

Community resources can improve the safety of, access to, and quality of education. Education authorities, the local community, and humanitarian actors should encourage community members to identify and help vulnerable children and young people gain access to learning opportunities and continue to higher education levels.

Communities and education authorities should work together to make schools, ECD centers, and other learning environments safe and protective places for children and young people. This can include organizing safe access and transportation, and reaching out to those living in isolated and remote areas. Community members can help teachers by serving as classroom assistants or school focal persons, or by taking on non-teaching tasks like preparing resources. Learners will benefit from having community members of all genders serve as ECD caregivers and classroom assistants, or from having them provide security support to ensure that all learners will be safe on the way to and from school. Providing childcare in learning spaces can help caregivers, particularly girls and young women who are mothers or are caring for younger siblings, to continue their education. Young children also benefit from having both female and male early childhood caregivers. Communities and other stakeholders should ensure that strong role models of all genders are involved across the learning continuum (for more guidance, see INEE Guidance Note on Gender).

Where distance education programs are being used, neighbors, extended family, and siblings can help support both teachers and learners. For example, the community can provide homes or community spaces as learning centers. Bringing this about may first require raising community awareness about the benefits of and support needed to provide distance education (for more guidance, see INEE Background Paper on Distance Education in Emergencies).

In areas where formal education opportunities that meet the needs and demands of young people are not available, the community can advocate for non-formal education programs. This might include accelerated education, catch-up classes, lessons in basic literacy and numeracy, TVET, and small business development training. To ensure that non-formal education programs are recognized, the education authorities should lead their design, with support from the community. Where relevant, development and humanitarian partners should also be involved in developing these programs (for more guidance see Minimum Economic Recovery Standards, Enterprise and Market Systems Development Standards).

Regresar al inicio
3
Community contributions

When education authorities or other stakeholders plan, implement, and report on activities, they should include information on community contributions. Strong community contribution shows a sense of ownership and helps create long-term support. However, contributions from the community should not be a condition for receiving support, as the national authorities have a legal responsibility to fulfill the right to education.

It is important that children and young people, especially those from marginalized groups, participate in the design and needs assessment stages of education planning. Stakeholders should encourage and recognize their participation in and contributions to peer education, community mobilization, and community development initiatives.

Regresar al inicio
4
Disaster risk reduction and conflict mitigation

National authorities, the local community, and humanitarian actors should use local resources to develop, adapt, and share information on DRR education and community response preparedness. When community resources are used to develop, adapt, and deliver education, it is important to draw from and strengthen positive local coping strategies, technical and scientific knowledge, and capacities for disaster risk management. For example, engaging community members and using local materials to design, rebuild, or retrofit learning environments makes it easier for the community to take responsibility for maintaining these spaces over the long term. Local and indigenous knowledge of the land and how to adapt to environmental changes can support DRR, building resilience, and sustainable development.

When actors mobilize resources in an environment where resources are scarce, they must adhere to conflict sensitive and “do no harm” principles (for more guidance, see INEE Guidance Note on Conflict Sensitive Education). To assess whether resources are being mobilized in conflict sensitive ways, it is important to consider the following:

  • Who is providing the resource
  • How the resource affects the relationship between the education activity and dynamics of the conflict or crisis
  • How the resource will affect the provision of equal and equitable access to education for all learners
Regresar al inicio

Supporting Resources

Recursos de apoyo
14 Septiembre 2022 Manual/Handbook/Guide Education Cannot Wait (ECW), Inter-agency Network for Education in Emergencies (INEE), United Nations Girls Education Initiative (UNGEI)

EiE-GenKit

The EiE-GenKit is a core resource package for gender in education in emergencies. The EiE-GenKit is the first resource of its kind, providing education practitioners with practical tools to promote gender-responsive programming  from crisis to peace and sustainable development.

15 Agosto 2022 Background Paper Inter-agency Network for Education in Emergencies (INEE)

INEE Background Paper on Distance Education in Emergencies

This background paper highlights specific challenges, lessons learned, practices, and actions to consider when aiming to provide quality, principles-based distance education (DE) in emergencies. The paper considers inclusion and equity to be key guiding principles for education in general and calls for their application across all education modalities, especially distance education.

1 Marzo 2013 Manual / Guía Red Inter Agencial para la Educación en Situaciones de Emergencias (INEE)

Notas de orientación de la inee sobre educación sensible al conflicto

Estas notas de orientación están dirigidas a respaldar y extender el contenido de las Normas Mínimas de la INEE, a fin de entregar a profesionales y responsables políticos, que trabajan en contextos frágiles afectados por conflicto, una herramienta de referencia sobre las estrategias educativas y recursos sensibles al conflicto.

9 Julio 2019 Manual / Guía Red Inter Agencial para la Educación en Situaciones de Emergencias (INEE), Iniciativa de las Naciones Unidas para la Educación de las Niñas (UNGEI)

Nota de orientación de la INEE sobre género

La Nota de Orientación de la INEE sobre equidad de género ofrece asesoramiento sobre cómo proporcionar educación con perspectiva de género a cualquier persona involucrada en esta tarea como parte de una preparación, respuesta o respuesta ante una situación de emergencia.

29 Junio 2018 Manual / Guía Red Inter Agencial para la Educación en Situaciones de Emergencias (INEE)

Nota de orientación de la inee sobre apoyo psicosocial

Esta Nota de orientación de la INEE aborda la brecha que existe en las herramientas actualmente disponibles para los educadores y profesionales que trabajan en contextos de crisis y emergencias.

24 Mayo 2022 Manual / Guía Red Inter Agencial para la Educación en Situaciones de Emergencias (INEE)

Nota de orientación para el bienestar del docente en situaciones de emergencia

Esta Nota de orientación ofrece recomendaciones sobre cómo apoyar el bienestar docente en las cinco ámbitos de las Normas Mínimas de la INEE.

5 Abril 2017 Manual / Guía
La Red SEEP

Normas mínimas para la recuperación económica

El MERS ofrece herramientas para agencias humanitarias, organizaciones intergubernamentales, poblaciones locales y departamentos gubernamentales para mejorar la efectividad y calidad de la asistencia económica ofrecida, y así hacer una diferencia significativa en las vidas de las personas afectadas por desastres.

10 Octubre 2019 Manual / Guía Alianza para la Protección de la Niñez y la Adolescencia en la Acción Humanitaria

Normas mínimas para la protección de la niñez y adolescencia en la acción humanitaria (2019)

Las normas mínimas para la protección de la niñez y adolescencia en la acción humanitaria, NMPNA (siglas en inglés: CPMS) se han convertido en uno de los recursos clave para los trabajadores humanitarios desde su lanzamiento en el 2012.

1 Enero 2018 Manual / Guía Proyecto Esfera

El Manual Esfera: Carta Humanitaria y normas mínimas para la respuesta humanitaria

Los usuarios principales del Manual Esfera son profesionales que trabajan en la planificación, la gestión o la ejecución de una respuesta humanitaria, entre ellos el personal y los voluntarios de organizaciones humanitarias locales, nacionales e internacionales, así como las propias personas afectadas, que responden a una situación de crisis.

Indicadores

Untitled Spreadsheet
INEE Domain INEE Standard Indicator/Program Requirements Clarification Numerator Denominator Target Disaggregation Source of Indicator Source of Data Available Tool Crisis Phase
Foundational Standards Community Participation Participation (FDN/Community Participation Std 1)

Community members participate actively, transparently, and without discrimination in analysis, planning, design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation of education responses.
1.1 Percentage of parents actively participating in the conception and implementation of education in emergencies services Number of parents consulted Number of parents To be defined by program Gender Based on OCHA Indicator Registry Program documentation No tool required; INEE MS and indicator definitions sufficient All stages
1.2 Percentage of parents satisfied with the quality and appropriateness of response at the end of the project Number of parents satisfied with the quality and appropriateness of response at the end of the project Number of parents 100% NA Based on OCHA Indicator Registry Program documentation Tool required All stages
Resources (FDN/Community Participation Std 2)

Community resources are identified, mobilized and used to implement age-appropriate learning opportunities.
1.3 Analysis of opportunity to use local resources is carried out and acted on Scale 1-5 (1 = low, 5 = high) 5 NA New Program/procurement documentation Tool required All stages
Coordination Coordination (FDN/Coordination Std 1)

Coordination mechanisms for education are in place to support stakeholders working to ensure access to and continuity of quality education.
1.4 Percentage of regular relevant coordination mechanism (i.e., Education Cluster, EiEWG, LEGs) meetings attended by program team Number of regular relevant coordination mechanism (i.e.; Education Cluster, EiE Working Group (WG), Local Education Group (LEG) meetings attended by program team Number of regular relevant coordination mechanism (i.e. Education Cluster, EiEWG, LEGs) meetings held during organizational presence 100% NA New Meeting records No tool required; INEE MS and indicator definitions sufficient All stages
Analysis Assessment (FDN/Analysis Std 1)

Timely education assessments of the emergency situation are conducted in a holistic, transparent, and participatory manner.
1.5 Percentage of education needs assessments, carried out by the relevant coordinating body the program has participated in These include initial rapid and ongoing/rolling assessments Number of assessments organization contributed to Number of possible assessments organization could have contributed to 100% NA New Assessment records No tool required; INEE MS and indicator definitions sufficient All stages
Response Strategies (FDN/Analysis Std 2)

Inclusive education response strategies include a clear description of the context, barriers to the right to education, and strategies to overcome those barriers.
1.6 Strength of analysis of context, of barriers to the right to education, and of strategies to overcome those barriers Scale 1-5 (1 = low, 5 = high) 5 NA New Program documentation Tool required All stages
Monitoring (FDN/Analysis Std 3)

Regular monitoring of education response activities and the evolving learning needs of the affected population is carried out.
1.7 Percentage of education needs assessments carried out in defined time period Frequency to be defined by organization. Monitoring measures should be relevant to the desired program outcomes Number of education needs assessments carried out per year Number of education needs assessments required per year 100% NA New M&E plans and results No tool required; INEE MS and indicator definitions sufficient During program implementation
Evaluation (FDN/Analysis Std 4)

Systematic and impartial evaluations improve education response
activities and enhance accountability.
1.8 Number of evaluations carried out Number of evaluations carried out NA NA New M&E plans and results No tool required; INEE MS and indicator definitions sufficient Program completion
1.9 Percentage of evaluations shared with parents Number of evaluations shared with parents Number of evaluations 100% NA New M&E plans and results No tool required; INEE MS and indicator definitions sufficient Program completion