Journal on Education in Emergencies: Volume 5, Number 1

The Journal on Education in Emergencies aims to stimulate research and debate about education in emergencies; promote learning informed by evidence; define knowledge gaps and key trends for future research; and publish rigorous scholarly and practitioner work that will set standards for evidence in the field.

This special issue of JEiE—the first of two parts—showcases research on important developments in the field of refugee education across several regions, including the Middle East, Latin America, and Africa. The issue includes four research articles, one interview, two field notes, and three book reviews. 

The contributing authors describe and analyze how international agencies, state bureaucracies, local organizations and their partners, and refugees shape the structures that influence the education of refugees, both historically and in the present, and how these actors imagine their roles. In so doing, the authors help to untangle key questions about how responsibility for meeting refugees’ educational needs and aspiration is taken up and shared. The articles in this issue include immediate and long-term lessons for how refugee education is designed and experienced.

The full JEiE Volume 5, Number 1, as well as individual articles, can be downloaded by clicking on the titles below. 

 

CCThe Journal on Education in Emergencies, published by the Inter-agency Network for Education in Emergencies (INEE), is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

16 ديسمبر 2019 Journal Article Journal on Education in Emergencies (JEiE)

Asking “Why” and “How”: A Historical Turn in Refugee Education Research

This research article makes the case for a turn to historical approaches in refugee education research by providing an example of how historical methods were used to reconstruct a narrative timeline of the provision of education in Kenya’s Dadaab and Kakuma refugee camps.

16 ديسمبر 2019 Journal Article Journal on Education in Emergencies (JEiE)

Bureaucratic Encounters and the Quest for Educational Access among Colombian Refugees in Ecuador

Drawing from semi-structured interviews conducted with civil employees, NGO staffers, and Colombian refugees in Quito, Ecuador, in 2013 and 2014, this research article analyzes how access to school for Colombian refugee youth is shaped by the official and unofficial rules that regulate the formal education system.

16 ديسمبر 2019 Journal Article Journal on Education in Emergencies (JEiE)

Book Review: Muslims, Schooling and Security: Trojan Horse, Prevent and Racial Politics by Shamim Miah

Aislinn O’Donnell reviews Muslims, Schooling and Security: Trojan Horse, Prevent and Racial Politics by Shamim Miah. She explores the book’s analysis of the “Trojan Horse controversy” in Birmingham, UK, and demonstrates how Muslims have been “othered” and securitized in schools.

16 ديسمبر 2019 Journal Article Journal on Education in Emergencies (JEiE)

Book Review: International Perspectives on Teaching Rival Histories: Pedagogical Responses to Contested Narratives and the History Wars edited by Henrik Åström Elmersjö, Anna Clark, and Monika Vinterek

Rachel D. Hutchins reviews International Perspectives on Teaching Rival Histories: Pedagogical Responses to Contested Narratives and the History Wars, edited by Henrik Åström Elmersjö, Anna Clark, and Monika Vinterek. She explores how the book addresses the perennial question, “How do, or should, teachers pedagogically engage with rival histories?”

16 ديسمبر 2019 Journal Article Journal on Education in Emergencies (JEiE)

Book Review: Developing Community-Referenced Curricula for Marginalized Communities by David Baine

Caroline Ndirangu reviews Developing Community-Referenced Curricula for Marginalized Communities by David Baine. Ndirangu demonstrates that the book provides a needed foundation for the field of refugee education, which is grappling with how refugee youth experience education in national education systems.