Project Brief

Strengthening the Capacity of the Teaching Workforce in Primary and Secondary Schools for Conflict Sensitive Education in Three Districts (Arua, Moyo and Yumbe) of Northern Uganda

Published by
European Commission
UNESCO International Institute for Education Planning (UNESCO-IIEP)
Published
Topic(s)
Conflict - Conflict Sensitive Education
Social and Emotional Learning
Psychosocial Support
Violence - School-related Gender Based Violence

In an effort to promote a conflict sensitive education approach in the post-insurgency Northern Uganda, UNESCO in collaboration with the European Union – European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations (ECHO) provided support towards strengthening the capacity of the teaching workforce in primary and secondary schools for conflict sensitive education in the three districts of Arua, Moyo and Yumbe from the West Nile region of Northern Uganda.

 

This project aims at promoting access to quality, safe and relevant education for children and young people within the three host districts of Northern Uganda through the provision of CSE that fosters inclusivity, social cohesion, resilience, respect and safe learning environments for all learners irrespective of their ethnic backgrounds. 

The focus of this project is to strengthen policies and practices in the education sector and build the capacity of education officers and teachers to implement CSE programs which address the needs of children, help them overcome trauma and improve their well-being. 

The two-year long project is a basis for the establishment of Psychosocial Support Programs for learners that have been affected by conflicts to create a supportive learning environment and promote learners' psychological well-being. 

Purpose of the Baseline Survey: 

This study aimed to establish benchmark data related to the specific objectives and expected results of the project, so as to be able to measure progress towards the achievement of these objectives during the final evaluation.

It assesses the causes and dynamics of conflict(s) in the refugee settlements and host communities in the West Nile region of Northern Uganda and how they impact on the attainment of learning outcomes among the refugee children. The analysis also provides quality inputs and proposes a strategic road map for effectively implementing conflict-sensitive education programs as well as mainstreaming conflict transformation in the targeted communities in the West Nile region of Northern Uganda.

Purpose of the Conflict Analysis Report:

This report presents the findings of the Conflict Analysis Study (CAS) commissioned by UNESCO-Uganda, which was closely aligned with this project. The study identified and examined the underlying causes, triggers and drivers of conflict in fragile or emergency areas - refugee settlements and host communities in the West Nile region of Northern Uganda.

The study sought to establish the need for a stronger appreciation of Conflict Sensitive Education (CSE) by frontline education sector workers (teachers), policy makers, curriculum specialists, development partners, learners and communities in fragile and emergency contexts. Secondly, it focused on the need to build the capacity of all education stakeholders for mainstreaming of CSE through targeted interventions.

The empirical study was conducted in three project districts of West Nile, namely: Arua, Moyo, and Yumbe in addition to some specific key informant or high-level engagements in Kampala. The study identified the nature and dynamics of the major conflict causes, types, drivers, triggers, actors, related gaps and synergies in education, thus setting crucial benchmarks/strategies for informing UNESCO’s programming and interventions in those districts. 

It also aims to promote access to quality, safe and relevant education for children and young people within the three refugee host districts of Northern Uganda through the provision of conflict sensitive education that fosters inclusivity, social cohesion, resilience, respect and safe learning environments for all learners irrespective of their ethnic backgrounds.